Total Care - Vaccination

Vaccinations are needed in order to prevent your pet getting harmful and potentially life threatening diseases. We refer to our vaccinations as Total Care Vaccination, since all pets vaccinated by us benefit from much more than just a vaccine:

  • Full consultation and health check carried out with all vaccinations.
  • Free membership of the Ash Tree Vets EMERGENCY CLUB. This entitles members to £30 OFF out-of-hours consultation fees at our Market Harborough surgery.
  • Free nurse consultations at our Market Harborough surgery, such as; nail clipping, stitch removal, feeding and worming advice (and administering), weight clinics, youth clinics and healthcare advice.
  • £10 credit when joining our Healthcare Club within one week of vaccination.

 

Why choose Ash Tree Vets?

Call our friendly team on 01858 462 839 to make an appointment, or book online.

Dogs

Why should you vaccinate your dog?

Vaccinations are needed in order to prevent your dog getting harmful and potentially life threatening diseases.

Currently dogs are commonly vaccinated against the following diseases:

  • Canine distemper (‘hard pad’)
  • Canine parvovirus
  • Infectious canine hepatitis
  • Kennel cough
  • Leptospirosis
  • Parainfluenza


How is the vaccination given?

A vaccine is usually given by an injection under the skin, typically at the back of the neck/scruff, although sometimes may be given as drops into the eyes or nose. It is a preparation designed to provide protection against a specific infectious disease through stimulating an immune response that will protect the dog if it is subsequently exposed to the infection.

Kennel Cough vaccination is either given up the nose or less routinely into the eye or mouth.

When should you vaccinate?

When puppies are born they are usually protected from infections by their mother’s milk, providing she has been regularly vaccinated. However, this protection only lasts a few weeks so they need regular vaccinations from an early age.

The first vaccine can be given as young as six weeks of age, and the second is usually given two to four weeks later. Once your puppy has been vaccinated they need to stay off public ground for 7-10days before they can hit the big wide world and socialise with other dogs.

After the initial course of vaccination dogs will need regular boosters in their life to maintain protection. The frequency of boosters depends on the type of vaccine given, the lifestyle of your dog and the disease we are trying to protect against. In most situations booster vaccination is generally carried out yearly.

Cats

Why should you vaccinate your cat?

Vaccinations are needed in order to prevent your cat getting harmful and potentially life threatening diseases.

Currently cats are commonly vaccinated against the following diseases:

  • Feline panleukopenia (enteritis / feline parvovirus)
  • Feline herpes virus type 1 and Feline calicivirus
  • Feline leukaemia virus (often abbreviated to FeLV)
  • Chlamydophilia felis (only if specifically requested)

The Rabies vaccination is given to cats which are going abroad, if the country they are going to has a high incidence of rabies. Animals which are staying in the UK do not generally need this vaccination as we do not have a high incidence of this disease.

How is the vaccination given?

A vaccine is usually given by an injection under the skin, typically at the back of the neck/scruff, although sometimes may be given as drops into the eyes or nose. It is a preparation designed to provide protection against a specific infectious disease through stimulating an immune response that will protect the cat if it is subsequently exposed to the infection.

When should you vaccinate?

When kittens are born they are usually protected from infections by their mother’s milk, providing she has been regularly vaccinated. However, this protection only lasts a few weeks so they need regular vaccinations from an early age.

In most situations kittens are vaccinated for the first time around 9 weeks of age with a second dose 3 weeks later. It is important that a kitten receives both vaccinations to stimulate the immune system adequately. A kitten will not be fully protected until 7-10 days after the second vaccination. Under specific circumstances your veterinary surgeon may advise an alternative regime.

After the initial course of vaccination cats will need regular boosters in their life to maintain protection. The frequency of boosters depends on the type of vaccine given, the lifestyle of your cat and the disease we are trying to protect against. In most situations booster vaccination is generally carried out yearly, although some panleukopenia vaccines can now be given once every three years. Your vet will advise on the best regime for your cat.

Rabbits 

Why should you vaccinate your rabbit?

Vaccinations are needed in order to prevent your rabbit getting harmful and potentially life threatening diseases.

Currently rabbits are commonly vaccinated against the following diseases:

  • Myxomatosis
  • Viral haemorrhagic disease

These diseases cause intense suffering to rabbits and we strongly recommend vaccinating all pet rabbits.

When should you vaccinate?

Rabbits can be vaccinated from five weeks old and should receive regular boosters throughout their life.

What else can I do to reduce the risk?

To reduce the risk of infection we recommend that you deter insects such as flies and mosquitos, e.g. using insect-proof screens.

Ensure your pet and home is treated for fleas.

Rabbit enclosures/areas should be disinfected and cleaned regularly using rabbit-safe products. Change bedding and litter regularly.

Prevent contact with wild or affected domestic rabbits.

Myxomatosis

Myxomatosis is a virus spread by fleas, mites, and biting flies e.g. mosquitoes. It is also spread by contact between infected rabbits and persists in the environment (e.g. hutches). It is widespread in British wild rabbits.

Symptoms include puffy swellings around the face, ears and eyes (which can cause blindness), high fever, and difficulty eating and drinking.

There is no specific treatment for Myxomatosis and recovery is rare. Euthanasia is often the best option.

Rabbit (Viral) Haemorrhagic Disease (R(V)HD)

RVHD is extremely serious, causing; high fever, internal bleeding and liver disease. It is almost always fatal. Rabbits under six weeks of age are not affected.

RVHD is spread through rabbit contact and persists in the environment, e.g. hutches, carriers, clothing, and shoes.

There is no effective treatment for RVHD and vaccination is essential.